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    Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos Jr. wants to “reintroduce the Philippines” to the world. He has ambitious plans for his nation on the international stage and at home. That is, if the twin specters of pandemic and climate change can be overcome or at least managed. And if he can get past the legacies of two people: his predecessor, and his father. He also wants to strengthen ties with both the United States and China. That's a delicate balancing act for the Southeast Asian nation. Marcos spoke in an AP interview on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly.

      The Biden administration is ramping up diplomatic efforts to press China to end provocative actions against Taiwan and keep it from active support for Russia's war against Ukraine. U.S. officials say Secretary of State Antony Blinken made both cases in a meeting with his Chinese counterpart on Friday in a meeting on the sidelines of the annual UN Assembly in New York on Friday. The officials declined to describe the Chinese response but said Foreign Minister Wang Yi was receptive to the messages and that the two men agreed on the need to keep lines of communication open. Friday's talks between Blinken and Wang came amid a period of heightened tensions on both issues and ahead of an expected meeting in November between Presidents Joe Biden and Xi Jinping.

        An Arizona judge says the state can enforce a near-total ban on abortions that has been blocked for nearly 50 years. Friday’s ruling by a judge in Tucson came after the state’s Republican attorney general sought an order lifting an injunction that was issued shortly after the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision. Roe was overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court in June. Friday's ruling means clinics across Arizona will likely stop providing abortions. The law was first enacted decades before Arizona became a state in 1912. The only exception is if the mother’s life is in danger. Another law that bans abortions after 15 weeks takes effect Saturday.

          Elton John transformed the White House South Lawn into a musical lovefest Friday night as he played a farewell gig to honor everyday “heroes” like teachers, nurses and AIDS activists. But as it turns out, the event was also to honor the 75-year-old British songwriter — President Joe Biden surprised him with the National Humanities Medal for being a “tidal wave” who helped people rise up for justice. John said he’d played some beautiful venues before, but the stage in front of the White House, beneath a massive open-air tent on a perfect autumn night, was “probably the icing on the cake.”

            Indiana abortion clinics have resumed seeing patients a day after a judge put the state's abortion ban temporarily on hold. One patient who went to an Indianapolis clinic Friday was a woman who spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity due to privacy concerns. She said it was for her second abortion. She is 31 years old now. Her first was at 16, when she was afraid of caring for a child and worried what her parents would think about her being pregnant. Under Indiana’s ban, which has exceptions, abortion clinics would have lost their licenses and been prohibited from providing any abortion care, leaving such services solely to hospitals or outpatient surgical centers owned by hospitals.

              Sleep problems are a global epidemic that threatens the health of up to 45% of the world’s population. But it’s easy to recover from that sleep deficit, right, especially if you’re young? Unfortunately, a study has revealed that may not be the case, even for younger people.

              An Iowa man has been convicted of charges that he led a crowd of rioters in chasing a U.S. Capitol police officer up a staircase and accosting other officers guarding the Senate. That was one of the most harrowing scenes of the mob’s attack that day. A federal jury deliberated for roughly four hours before convicting Douglas Jensen of felony charges that he obstructed Congress from certifying the Electoral College vote on Jan. 6, 2021, and that he assaulted or interfered with police officers during the siege. Jensen was convicted on all counts, including a charge that he engaged in disorderly conduct inside the Capitol while carrying a folding knife in his pocket.

              FRIDAY, Sept. 23, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- There was an increase in human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination per encounter for pediatric patients aged 9 to 22 years, despite a decrease in overall encounters associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a research letter published online Sept. 19 in JAMA Network Open.

              FRIDAY, Sept. 23, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- At least 4.4 million Americans have received the updated COVID-19 booster shot. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention posted the count Thursday as public health experts decried President Joe Biden's televised claim that "the pandemic is over."

              In-person voting for the midterm elections has started in Minnesota, South Dakota, Virginia and Wyoming, in a landscape that has changed since the pandemic drove a shift to mail balloting in the 2020 presidential contest. Twenty people voted in the first hour after Minneapolis’ early voting center opened Friday. They took advantage of generous rules that election officials credit with making Minnesota a perennial leader in voter turnout. In-person voting starts Saturday in New Jersey. Saturday also is the deadline by which election officials must send ballots to their military and overseas voters. North Carolina started mailing out absentee ballots Sept. 9.

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              Republican Tim Michels says he would sign an abortion ban with exceptions for rape and incest if it came to his desk as governor. That's a shift from his earlier statement that the state’s 1849 ban — with an exception only for the life of the mother — was “an exact mirror” of his position. Currently, an 1849 law bans all abortion procedures in Wisconsin, with no exceptions for rape or incest. Polls have repeatedly shown that a majority of people in Wisconsin support abortion rights. A spokeswoman for Evers’ campaign says she doubts that Michels’ views have changed.

              As billions of dollars in opioid lawsuit settlements are starting to flow to governments, families and advocates impacted by the opioid crisis are pushing for a meaningful say in how the money will be used. There are requirements to direct most of it to fighting the deepening crisis, and in some states, people in recovery or who lost relatives have been put on committees making spending recommendations. But advocates from New York to Nevada are worried they won’t have enough input on how the money is used. The funding processes are already subject to a partisan tussle in Wisconsin and a lawsuit in Ohio.

              The Republican nominee for U.S. Senate in Pennsylvania, Dr. Mehmet Oz, has released his health records as he maneuvers to keep questions about Democratic rival John Fetterman’s recovery from a stroke front and center. Dr. Rebecca Kurth wrote in a letter that she found the heart surgeon-turned-TV celebrity to be in “excellent health” in an annual checkup Thursday. The release of the doctor’s note and health records comes as Oz has increasingly made Fetterman’s fitness to serve a central theme in his campaign and as Oz is trying to close a gap in polls. Fetterman maintains that doctors expect him to make a full recovery.

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